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Surveillance Systems for Cannabis Grow Ops and Dispensaries

Discussing Washington Initiative I-502, Oregon OLCC, Colorado Medical Marijuana Code 6-14-10, Lansing, Michigan Municipal Ordinance §1300.05, Nevada LCB File No. R148-15, New York Chapter XIII, Part 1004, Delaware: 4470 State of Delaware Medical Marijuana Code, Guam: RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING 16 JOAQUIN (KC) CONCEPCION II, 17 COMPASSIONATE CANNABIS USE, 18 ACT OF 2013, Massachusetts: Chapter 369 of the Acts of 2012, "An Act for the Humanitarian Medical Use of Marijuana", Arizona: R9-17-318. Security, Alaska 3 AAC 306: Security, Rhode Island Gen. Laws § 21-28.6-16(b)(4), and Arkansas ABC MM.*

Submit a Floorplan to get Professional Assistance

Before we get started, feel free to submit a floorplan to get help. If you live in Washington, this floorplan is actually required, as you will need one that you can make available to the state, should they request it. This service is free and will help you determine what you need as well.


Let's start with Washington as their regulations are more complicated.

Understanding the Regulations you face as a Cannabis Grow Op regarding Security Cameras

Right now there are three states that have made it legal to grow cannabis commercially: Washington, Oregon, and Colorado. Several other states have decriminalized Marijuana possession or created medical marijuana dispensaries in at least some capacity.

Here are the requirements for Washington state as listed in WAC314-55-083(3), sec. title: "What are the security requirements for a marijuana licensee?"

(3) Surveillance system. At a minimum, a complete video surveillance with minimum camera resolution of 640x470 pixel and must be internet protocol (IP) compatible and recording system for controlled areas within the licensed premises and entire perimeter fencing and gates enclosing an outdoor grow operation, to ensure control of the area. The requirements include image acquisition, video recording, management and monitoring hardware and support systems. All recorded images must clearly and accurately display the time and date. Time is to be measured in accordance with the U.S. National Institute Standards and Technology standards.

(a) All controlled access areas, security rooms/areas and all points of ingress/egress to limited access areas, all points of ingress/egress to the exterior of the licensed premises, and all point-of-sale (POS) areas must have fixed camera coverage capable of identifying activity occurring within a minimum of twenty feet of all entry and exit points.

(b) Camera placement shall allow for the clear and certain identification of any individual on the licensed premises.

(c) All entrances and exits to the facility shall be recorded from both indoor and outdoor vantage points, and capable of clearly identifying any activities occurring within the facility or within the grow rooms in low light conditions. The surveillance system storage device must be secured on-site in a lock box, cabinet, closet, or secured in another manner to protect from employee tampering or criminal theft.

(d) All perimeter fencing and gates enclosing an outdoor grow operation must have full video surveillance capable of clearly identifying any activities occurring within twenty feet of the exterior of the perimeter. Any gate or other entry point that is part of the enclosure for an outdoor growing operation must have fixed camera coverage capable of identifying activity occurring within a minimum of twenty feet of the exterior, twenty-four hours a day. A motion detection lighting system may be employed to illuminate the gate area in low light conditions.

(e) Areas where marijuana is grown, cured or manufactured including destroying waste, shall have a camera placement in the room facing the primary entry door, and in adequate fixed positions, at a height which will provide a clear, unobstructed view of the regular activity without a sight blockage from lighting hoods, fixtures, or other equipment, allowing for the clear and certain identification of persons and activities at all times.

(f) All marijuana or marijuana-infused products that are intended to be removed or transported from marijuana producer to marijuana processor and/or marijuana processor to marijuana retailer shall be staged in an area known as the "quarantine" location for a minimum of twenty-four hours. Transport manifest with product information and weights must be affixed to the product. At no time during the quarantine period can the product be handled or moved under any circumstances and is subject to auditing by the liquor control board or designees.

(g) All camera recordings must be continuously recorded twenty-four hours a day. All surveillance recordings must be kept for a minimum of forty-five days on the licensee's recording device. All videos are subject to inspection by any liquor control board employee or law enforcement officer, and must be copied and provided to the board or law enforcement officer upon request.

How to Comply with Washington's Recording Regulations:

Number one, the regulations are pretty confusingly written and in some cases don't make much sense. This makes complying with them kinda a judgement call. Here's the issues:

Issue Number 1: 640x470 is not a known recording resolution in surveillance.

D1 DVRs shoot in 720 x 480. (345,600 total pixels)

With someone 20 feet away, with D1 resolution, your footage would look like this:


Issue Number 2: "The Cameras must be IP compatible," but IP cameras shoot in HD - either at 720P or 1080P.

720p is 1280 x 720. (921,600 total pixels)

1080p is 1920x1080. (2,073,600 total pixels)

With someone 20 feet away, with 1080P resolution, your footage would look like this:


Issue Number 3: At multiple points, the regulation says that you must be able to ID someone at 20 ft.

Now, you aren't going to be able to do that with the camera system that shoots in 640x470 (if that existed). You can only do that with HD.

Our analysis: choose a system that shoots in 1080P or above to make sure you comply with the regulation.

If you go with 720P, you will need a camera about every 30 feet if you want to ID people and the cameras will have 52 degree fields of view. If you go with 1080P, you will need a camera every 50 feet and they will have a 75, 98, or 360 degree field of view (depending on the camera). Because the quality level is more than double for 1080P while the cost in only about 20% more, we believe that you will actually save money by installing fewer 1080P cameras and spacing them out more.

How to Comply with Washington's Storage Regulations:

The storage requirements are where this really gets nasty. You're required to store 45 days of footage. What does that mean for TBs required?

Well, that's actually really complicated. Video takes different amount of space when filming things that vary a lot. So for example, a video of the sky (something that doesn't change much) won't take up as much space as a video of a busy intersection (something that changes a lot). This is because when a video does not change from frame a to frame b, it doesn't need to record as much information (it basically just needs to state "same as the first frame." These are averages on what your hard drive space would need to be, however, if you get more traffic it can take more space and if you get less traffic it will take less space. The 45 day regulation places a burden on you (the amount of storage is absurd), and we suggest monitoring it when you install it to see if these assumptions are correct.

Number of Cameras

16

24

32

48

64

D1 Resolution (720 x 480)

7.5TB 12TB 15TB 24TB 30TB

720p Resolution (1280 x 720)

18TB 27TB 36TB 54TB 72TB

1080p Resolution (1920x1080)

25TB 38TB 50TB 74TB 100TB

These are our largest NVRs

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  1. The Executive 64 Channel NVR - SKU: EXEC64

    The Executive 64 Channel NVR - SKU: EXEC64

    In stock.
    Usually ships the same business day if ordered before 2PM EST.

    ***Please note, this price does not include hard drives. Please click Add to Cart to select your Hard Drive options and view the configured price.

    $3,499.00


    Resolution


    This NVR can record 64 of our 1080P cameras at 30 FPS each or 64 of our 4MP cameras at 20 FPS each
    How to avoid being ripped off by fake "1080P" NVRs

    320 Mbps of total incoming bitrate
    What can I do with Spare Bitrate?


    Features


    8 hard drive bays
    Rack Mountable (ears included)
    Motion Alert Emails
    Motion Detection Recording
    IntelliPro Ready
    Remote Footage Download
    Footage Download via USB
    Easy Backup to NAS or eSata

    Learn about how this NVR can create create a second copy of your footage


    Viewing


    Online Viewing
    Dual VGA Monitor Out (up to 1080P)
    Dual HDMI Out for TVs (up to 4K)
    4K and 12MP Camera Capable
    Smartphone Apps
    Tablet Apps
    Windows Viewing + Apps
    Mac Viewing + Apps


    Connections


    2x Cat5e (RJ45) Ethernet to Network (one for main network; one for camera subnetwork)
    Standard 3-Prong Wall Plug
    Cameras can connect via Cat5e to a POE Switch anywhere on your Network
    Alarm inputs / outputs



  2. The Executive 80 Channel NVR - SKU: EXEC80

    The Executive 80 Channel NVR - SKU: EXEC80

    In stock.
    Usually ships the same business day if ordered before 2PM EST.

    ***Please note, this price does not include hard drives. Please click Add to Cart to select your Hard Drive options and view the configured price.

    $6,999.00


    Resolution


    This NVR can record 80 of our 1080P cameras at 30 FPS each or 57 of our 4MP cameras at 20 FPS each
    How to avoid being ripped off by fake "1080P" NVRs

    400 Mbps of total incoming bitrate
    What can I do with Spare Bitrate?


    Features


    16 hard drive bays
    Rack Mountable (ears included)
    Motion Alert Emails
    Motion Detection Recording
    IntelliPro Ready
    Remote Footage Download
    Footage Download via USB
    Easy Backup to NAS or eSata

    Learn about how this NVR can create create a second copy of your footage


    Viewing


    Online Viewing
    Dual VGA Monitor Out (up to 1080P)
    Dual HDMI Out for TVs (up to 4K)
    4K and 12MP Camera Capable
    Smartphone Apps
    Tablet Apps
    Windows Viewing + Apps
    Mac Viewing + Apps


    Connections


    4x Cat5e (RJ45) Ethernet to Network
    Dual, Redundant Standard 3-Prong Wall Plug
    4x SFP
    Cameras can connect via Cat5e to a POE Switch anywhere on your Network
    Alarm inputs / outputs



  3. Front of EXEC128

    The Executive 128 Channel NVR - SKU: EXEC128

    Backordered
    More on the way in 3-7 business days.

    ***Please note, this price does not include hard drives. Please click Add to Cart to select your Hard Drive options and view the configured price.

    $9,999.00


    Resolution


    This NVR can record 128 of our 1080P cameras at 30 FPS each or 106 of our 4MP cameras at 20 FPS each
    How to avoid being ripped off by fake "1080P" NVRs

    640 Mbps of total incoming bitrate
    What can I do with Spare Bitrate?


    Features


    24 hard drive bays
    Rack Mountable (ears included)
    Motion Alert Emails
    Motion Detection Recording
    IntelliPro Ready
    Remote Footage Download
    Footage Download via USB
    Easy Backup to NAS or eSata

    Learn about how this NVR can create create a second copy of your footage


    Viewing


    Online Viewing
    Dual VGA Monitor Out (up to 1080P)
    Dual HDMI Out for TVs (up to 4K)
    4K and 12MP Camera Capable
    Smartphone Apps
    Tablet Apps
    Windows Viewing + Apps
    Mac Viewing + Apps


    Connections


    4x Cat5e (RJ45) Ethernet to Network
    Dual, Redundant Standard 3-Prong Wall Plug
    Cameras can connect via Cat5e to a POE Switch anywhere on your Network
    Alarm inputs / outputs


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It has 32 Total TB of internal storage.

So, How Do You Meet Your Storage Requirements? The Straight Way

1. NAS Backup

NAS

Our NVRs have the ability to store to a NAS as either a backup or extension of your internal drives.

A NAS or Network Attached Storage is an easy way to either increase the storage space available to your recorder or have a redundant, off recorder storage device - allowing you to have two copies of recorded footage.

You set both the internal and NAS hard drives into groups and assign the cameras to groups. This way you can set some cameras to record longer than others.


2. eSata

esata drive array

Our Executive and Edge lines of NVRs have an eSata connection on the back so that you can attach a hot swappable eSata drive array which can function as either a backup or extension of your internal drives.

You set both the internal and eSata hard drives into groups and assign the cameras to groups. This way you can set some cameras to record longer than others.


That's still a lot of data to store!

So, How Do You Meet Your Storage Requirements? The Loophole

Normally cameras take 30 pictures per second (FPS), but your regulation only requires 10 FPS per camera.

If instead of doing 30 FPS per camera, you do 15FPS, you would be able to cut your storage requirements in half.

If instead of doing 30 FPS per camera, you do 10FPS, you would be able to cut your storage requirements to a third.

Storage Requirements At 15FPS

Number of Cameras

16

24

32

48

64

D1 Resolution (720 x 480)

4TB 6TB 8TB 12TB 16TB

720p Resolution (1280 x 720)

9TB 14TB 18TB 28TB 32TB

1080p Resolution (1920x1080)

12TB 19TB 24TB 38TB 48TB

Storage Requirements At 10FPS

Number of Cameras

16

24

32

48

64

D1 Resolution (720 x 480)

2.5TB 4TB 5.3TB 8TB 10.7TB

720p Resolution (1280 x 720)

6TB 9.3TB 12TB 18.7TB 22TB

1080p Resolution (1920x1080)

8TB 12.6TB 16TB 25.3TB 32TB




Here are the requirements for Colorado state as listed in Chapter 6-14: Medical Marijuana 6-14-10. Legislative Intent and Purpose., sec. title: "Requirements Related to Monitoring and Security of Restricted Areas and Inventory?"

All components of the security plan submitted with the application, as it may be amended, shall be in good working order, monitored, and secured twenty-four hours per day. A separate security system is required for each business. The security plan must include, at a minimum, the following security measures:

(a) Cameras. The medical marijuana business shall install and use security cameras to monitor and record all areas of the premises (except in restrooms and consulting rooms while a patient is undressed), and where persons may gain or attempt to gain access to marijuana or cash maintained by the medical marijuana business. Cameras shall record operations of the business to the off-site location, as well as all potential areas of ingress or egress to the business with sufficient detail to identify facial features and clothing. Recordings from security cameras shall be maintained for a minimum of forty days* (this was originally 30 and later revised to 40 days) in a secure offsite location in the city or through a service over a network that provides on-demand access, commonly referred to as a "cloud." The offsite location shall be included in the security plan submitted to the city and provided to the Boulder Police Department upon request, and updated within seventy-two hours of any change of such location.

(b) Use of Safe for Storage. The medical marijuana business shall install and use a safe for storage of any processed marijuana and cash on the premises when the business is closed to the public. The safe shall be incorporated into the building structure or securely attached thereto. For medical marijuana-infused products that must be kept refrigerated or frozen, the business may lock the refrigerated container or freezer in a manner authorized by the city in place of use of a safe so long as the container is affixed to the building structure.

(c) Alarm System. The medical marijuana business shall install and use an alarm system that is monitored by a company that is staffed twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. The security plan submitted to the city shall identify the company monitoring the alarm, including contact information, and updated within seventy-two hours of any change of monitoring company.

Revision:

*RETAIL MARIJUANA CODE 1 CCR 212-2 added a few more items

1. All camera views of all Limited Access Areas must be continuously recorded 24 hours a day. The use of motion detection is authorized when a Licensee can demonstrate that monitored activities are adequately recorded.

2. All surveillance recordings must be kept for a minimum of 40 days and be in a format that can be easily accessed for viewing. Video recordings must be archived in a format that ensures authentication of the recording as legitimately captured video and guarantees that no alteration of the recorded image has taken place.

How to Comply with the Colorado Recording Regulations:

Colorado does not have as much in terms of recording requirements, other than having cameras.

How to Comply with the Colorado Storage Regulations:

Like Washington State, the storage requirements are the hard part.

We made a pretty extensive write up your storage options and needs on the first discussion on this page (Washington state) that goes into products, options and backup/hard drive extension mechanisms. For Colorado, you would only need 88% of what a provider in Washington State would need on the charts we have listed there.

As far as the requirement for offsite storage, ignore that as it would mean you driving back and forth to that location and that would be a huge hassle. Focus on the "or" in that regulation. Despite having a fundamental misunderstand as to how the system works and essentially writing gibberish, we think that when they say "through a service over a network that provides on-demand access, commonly referred to as a 'cloud,'" that they mean, that you can watch the system remotely. This describes every surveillance system we carry and the majority on the market. The technology however is P2P rather than cloud. Cloud based surveillance is a pipedream that can only exist when the average internet upload speeds are about 1000x faster than they are now. Our NVRs can save to the cloud; however nearly all customers are unable to do so as the speed at which surveillance systems create video footage for a single camera is far greater than the average upload speed of an US internet connection.







(1) A licensee must have cameras that continuously record, 24 hours a day, in all areas with marijuana items on the licensed premises.

(2) A licensee must:

(a) Use cameras that record at a minimum resolution of 1280 x 720 px;

(b) Keep all surveillance recordings for a minimum of 40 (updated to 90 or more, if requested) calendar days and in a format approved by the Commission that can be easily accessed for viewing and easily reproduced;

(c) Have a surveillance system that has the capability to produce a still photograph from any camera image;

(d) Have the date and time embedded on all surveillance recordings without significantly obscuring the picture;

(e) Archive video recordings in a format that ensures authentication of the recording as a legitimately-captured video and guarantees that no alterations of the recorded image has taken place;

(f) Keep surveillance recordings for periods exceeding 30 days upon request of the Commission and make video surveillance records and recordings available immediately upon request to the Commission for the purpose of ensuring compliance with the Act and these rules;


NEW RULE:

(d) Keep all surveillance recordings for a minimum of 90 calendar days and in a format approved by the Commission that can be easily accessed for viewing and easily reproduced, and upon request of the Commission, keep surveillance recordings for periods exceeding 90 days.

NEW RULE 12/28/2016:

Location of back up recordings. Keeping back up recordings on-site is no longer an option at all (OAR 845-025-1450(4) has been removed). Back up video must be made in real time and kept off of the licensed premises. Applicants are permitted to submit a waiver request, but it is highly unlikely it will be approved given that the rules still only require that back up recordings be kept of the surveillance room or area.


How to Comply with the Oregon Recording Regulations:

Oregon requires that you have at least 720P (1280 x 720 px) resolution cameras. This means that you have to pick HD cameras. All of our cameras are HD.

How to Comply with the Oregon Storage Regulations:

Like Washington State, the storage requirements are the hard part. Luckily you are only required to store 40 days of footage.

How to comply with the real-time backup requirement

Like many other states on this list, Oregon, has passed a regulation that doesn't reflect actual conditions on the ground. A 1080P camera requires about 5 MBps in upload speed, which is about the average upload speed for most people in the United States : meaning most people can't upload one camera to the cloud in full 3MP or 4MP resolution. Since most of our cannabis customers actually record in 3 or 4MP and have 30-60 cameras, this can be a major issue - you can't buy a internet connection speed that is fast enough to upload that much data. Because of these data limitations, high quality cameras don't tend to have cloud features.

We've seen inspectors rule two different ways of interpreting this rule.

1. "Off-site" means not in the same room. We've heard Oregon cannabis farms that get approved that connect a NAS for backup purposes, if that NAS is different part of the building.

2. "Off-site" means not in the same building. Here's how you comply with the law, when an inspector interprets the law this way: buy a Dropcam and put it in your storage room. Dropcam is made by Google and is a camera that is meant for watching pets or checking on the baby sitter. Although it is a bit light on resolution, security features, infrared, and won't let you watch multiple cameras at once, it does provide a really cheap convenient way for you to record video offsite - because it stores the video in the cloud. The law only requires that you have off site surveillance footage footage in that one room (we think because the state was worried that someone might break in and steal the recorder). Dropcams typically record in 720P (which is your minimum recording resolution), but can record up to 1080P - like all cloud cameras the resolution is based on your internet speed. Going with a completely separate cloud-based consumer-level camera is probably your only option.

Another reason that there could be such variance in the way that inspectors interpret the law could have to do with rural high speed internet adoption rates. Most urban centers have an upload speed fast enough to allow a Dropcam to upload the video, but rural locations (where you often find farms) have significantly slower internet speeds. Many rural locations don't even have one high speed internet option; the variance in interpretation may be due to whether your location have a high speed internet connection availible... or they may just be different rules by different inspectors.


We made a pretty extensive write up your storage options and needs on the first discussion on this page (Washington state) that goes into products, options and backup/hard drive extension mechanisms. For Colorado, you would only need 200% of what a provider in Washington State would need on the charts we have listed there.

Here are the requirements for Lansing, Michigan as listed in Ordinance §1300.05.

Medical marijuana establishments shall continuously monitor the entire premises on which they are operated with security cameras. The recordings shall be maintained in a secure, off-site location for a period of 14 days.

How to Comply with Lansing, Michigan Municipal Ordinance §1300.05's Recording Regulations:

The nice thing about this list of requirements is that it is much shorter than most other states, however, like the other states listed here, the regulations don't make much sense. Sadly, this regulation is so errant that here's no real way to comply, out-of-the-box, with this regulation with high quality HD security cameras.

The Main Issue: 5Mbps.

5 megabites per second is the minimum bandwidth that you would need to upload one, single 1080P camera. The average internet upload connection speed in the United States is less than that. The average business upload speed in the US is somewhat higher, but varies greatly by location. Until the internet connection speed in the United States vastly improves, the technical limitations of transmitting the data required for real-time backup of surveillance footage are insurmountable. Additionally, in that you are required to monitor "the entire premises" there's no way that one camera will be sufficient.

The Secondary issue: Liability Insurance.

Even beyond the technical limitations, there are very few single camera systems that store video to the cloud and most specifically state that they are not for security purposes. Most professional surveillance camera providers won't offer this service because of liability insurance. By providing an off-site cloud-based repository for footage that is specifically security or surveillance related, a company faces significant liability risk. Risk that is compounded by a far-too-slow and unreliable infrastructure. This is the main reason that no major surveillance system company offers any sort of cloud based storage.

Workaround #1: Daily Backups

You can export footage from the NVR (depending on model) to a USB drive or NAS or eSata drive. You could remove that data daily and store it offsite. This will be labor intensive.

Workaround #2: Automatic Backup to a NAS and then sync the NAS folder with Dropbox

You'll need an IT guy for this to work, but you can automatically export the footage to a NAS and then tell Dropbox to sync that folder with the cloud. You probably will have to sync very low quality files for this to work, so this isn't a great plan, but Michigan does not have any resolution requirements listed in Ordinance §1300.05. This is still a bad plan; you'd be sacrificing your security to comply with the security regulations, which is pretty counterintuitive.

How the Michigan Law Needs to Change

Modern surveillance systems have two file outputs: a main stream which is high resolution and recorded and a sub-stream which is usually low resolution (you can control the resolution on both feeds, so that they work with whatever internet connection speed you have) that is broadcast when you are viewing them remotely. We're not aware of any major brand that allows you to record the substream over the internet because of the aforementioned liability trap. This is why most other states' regulations state not that the footage has to be off-site, but has to be accessible off-site.

How was such a bad regulation created?

With the very low resolution cameras (lower than non-HD TV) that were popular 15 years ago, you could store a significant amount of time on a DVR since the video footage itself was so low quality that it didn't take up as much space. So, storing your footage on removable media was an option. With a 32 channel 1080P system (and most cannabis clients opt for 1.5x or 2x 1080P quality level), you'd need to swap the DVD every 25 minutes, 24-hours-a-day. If you opted for the more popular 4MP cameras (2x 1080P), you couldn't even burn a DVD as fast as you were making the footage. These regulations don't seem to have kept up with the advances to video resolution and, more to the point, the lack of advances to removable media.







Security equipment to deter and prevent unauthorized entrance into limited access areas that includes, without limitation:

(a) Devices or a series of devices to detect unauthorized intrusion, which may include a signal system interconnected with a radio frequency method, such as cellular or private radio signals, or other mechanical or electronic device;

(b) Exterior lighting to facilitate surveillance;

(c) Electronic monitoring, including, without limitation:

(1) At least one call-up monitor that is 19 inches or more;

(2) A video printer capable of immediately producing a clear still photo from any video camera image;

(3) Video cameras with a recording resolution of at least 704 x 480 or the equivalent which provide coverage of all entrances to and exits from limited access areas and all entrances to and exits from the building and which are capable of identifying any activity occurring in or adjacent to the building;

(4) A video camera at each point-of-sale location which allows for the identification of any person who holds a valid registry identification card or letter of approval for an applicant who is under 10 years of age or his or her designated primary caregiver purchasing medical marijuana;

(5) A video camera in each grow room which is capable of identifying any activity occurring within the grow room in low light conditions;

(6) A method for storing video recordings from the video cameras for at least 30 calendar days;

(7) A failure notification system that provides an audible and visual notification of any failure in the electronic monitoring system; and

(8) Sufficient battery backup for video cameras and recording equipment to support at least 5 minutes of recording in the event of a power outage; and

(d) Immediate automatic or electronic notification to alert local law enforcement agencies of an unauthorized breach of security at the medical marijuana establishment in the interior of each building of the medical marijuana establishment.

How to Comply with Nevada LCB File No. R148-15 Non-Security-Camera, but Security-Related Regulations:

Alarms, Access Control, Printers, and Monitors

Before we get into the surveillance end, we do want to draw your attention to the requirements for either an alarm or access control system and a lighting system. Also, you are required to have a printer and a 19 inch or larger monitor on site. This means having a PC or Mac onsite is necessary since you cannot connect a printer to your NVR.

Battery Backup for 5 minutes

APC.com has a great tool for calculating and suggesting battery backup products based on time and load. Once you have a quote from us, our staff can tell your approximate power draw for our products. You aren't required to, but you should also add in your alarm or access control units when calculating load. We would also suggest aiming a bit higher than 5 minutes.

How to Comply with Nevada's Recording Regulations:

Like several state we already mentioned on this page, 704 x 480 is not a known recording resolution in surveillance and we have no idea where that came from. 720 x 480 is and that's probably what they meant.

D1 DVRs shoot in 720 x 480. (345,600 total pixels)

With someone 20 feet away, with D1 resolution, your footage would look like this:


The regulation says that you must be able to ID anyone at the point of sale location.

Now, you aren't going to be able to do that with the camera system that shoots in 704x480 (if that existed). You can only do that with HD.

If you go with 720P, you will need a camera about every 30 feet if you want to ID people and the cameras will have 52 degree fields of view. If you go with 1080P, you will need a camera every 50 feet and they will have a 75, 98, or 106 degree field of view (depending on the camera).

Most people opt for at least a 1080P camera. With someone 20 feet away, with 1080P resolution, your footage would look like this:


The Low Light Camera for the Grow Room

Almost all of our IP cameras have either Digital WDR or True WDR which should allow you to meet the regulatory demands for the low light cameras, however this regulation has no specific requirements for their lux rating (how we measure how much light is in a space) to clarify what qualifies as "low light," so it is a bit of a judgement call. True WDR would be your best option.

The "Failure Notification System" Requirement

All of our NVRs and cameras have notices that go out if the cameras are tampered with, disconnected, damaged, or moved. You can also enabled motion detection alerts and many other video analytics on our Intellipro cameras. However, it seems more likely that this regulation is referencing the alarm or access control system, but it is pretty unclear. Either way, you should be fine.

"Immediate automatic or electronic notification to alert local law enforcement..."

You'll probably need an alarm system with a monitoring contract to comply with this section. Cameras can't make phone calls and I've n. You can have the police set as the recipient of the motion detection email alerts, but you probably will want that to be your staff that gets those emails.

How to Comply with the Nevada Storage Regulations:

Like Washington State, the storage requirements are the hard part. Luckily you are only required to store 30 days of footage.

We made a pretty extensive write up your storage options and needs on the first discussion on this page (Washington state) that goes into products, options and backup/hard drive extension mechanisms. For Nevada, you would only need 66% of what a provider in Washington State would need on the we have listed there.







Security requirements for manufacturing and dispensing facilities.

(a) All facilities operated by a registered organization, including any manufacturing facility and dispensing facility, shall have a security system to prevent and detect diversion, theft or loss of marihuana and/or medical marijuana products, utilizing commercial grade equipment, which shall, at a minimum, include:

(1) a perimeter alarm;

(2) motion detectors;

(3) video cameras in all areas that may contain marihuana and at all points of entry and exit, which shall be appropriate for the normal lighting conditions of the area under surveillance. The manufacturing facility or dispensing facility shall direct cameras at all approved safes, approved vaults, dispensing areas, marihuana sales areas and any other area where marihuana is being produced, harvested, manufactured, stored, handled or dispensed. At entry and exit points, the manufacturing facility or dispensing facility shall angle cameras so as to allow for the capture of clear and certain identification of any person entering or exiting the facility;

(4) twenty-four hour recordings from all video cameras, which the manufacturing facility or dispensing facility shall make available for immediate viewing by the department or the department’s authorized representative upon request and shall be retained for at least 90 days. The registered organization shall provide the department with an unaltered copy of such recording upon request. If a registered organization is aware of a pending criminal, civil or administrative investigation or legal proceeding for which a recording may contain relevant information, the registered organization shall retain an unaltered copy of the recording until the investigation or proceeding is closed or the entity conducting the investigation or proceeding notifies the registered organization that it is not necessary to retain the recording;

(5) a duress alarm, which for purposes of this section means a silent security alarm system signal generated by the entry of a designated code into an arming station in order to signal that the alarm user is being forced to turn off the system;

(6) a panic alarm, which for purposes of this section, means an audible security alarm system signal generated by the manual activation of a device intended to signal a life threatening or emergency situation requiring a law enforcement response;

(7) a holdup alarm, which for purposes of this section, means a silent alarm signal generated by the manual activation of a device intended to signal a robbery in progress;

(8) an automatic voice dialer, which for purposes of this section, means any electrical, electronic, mechanical, or other device capable of being programmed to send a prerecorded voice message, when activated, over a telephone line, radio or other communication system, to a law enforcement, public safety or emergency services agency requesting dispatch;

(9) a failure notification system that provides an audible, text or visual notification of any failure in the surveillance system. The failure notification system shall provide an alert to the manufacturing facility or dispensing facility within five minutes of the failure, either by telephone, email, or text message;

(10) the ability to immediately produce a clear color still photo that is a minimum of 9600 dpi from any camera image (live or recorded);

(11) a date and time stamp embedded on all recordings. The date and time shall be synchronized and set correctly and shall not significantly obscure the picture; and

(12) the ability to remain operational during a power outage.

(b) A registered organization shall ensure that any manufacturing facility and dispensing facility maintains all security system equipment and recordings in a secure location so as to prevent theft, loss, destruction or alterations.

(c) In addition to the requirements listed in subdivision (a) of this section, each manufacturing facility and dispensing facility shall have a back-up alarm system approved by the department that shall detect unauthorized entry during times when no employees are present at the facility and that shall be provided by a company supplying commercial grade equipment, which shall not be the same company supplying the primary security system.

(d) A registered organization shall limit access to any surveillance areas solely to persons that are essential to surveillance operations, law enforcement agencies, security system service employees, the department or the department’s authorized representative, and others when approved by the department. A registered organization shall make available to the department or the department’s authorized representative, upon request, a current list of authorized employees and service employees who have access to any surveillance room. A manufacturing facility and dispensing facility shall keep all on-site surveillance rooms locked and shall not use such rooms for any other function.

(e) A registered organization shall keep illuminated the outside perimeter of any manufacturing facility and dispensing facility that is operated under the registered organization’s license.

(f) All video recordings shall allow for the exporting of still images in an industry standard image format (including .jpeg, .bmp, and .gif). Exported video shall have the ability to be archived in a proprietary format that ensures authentication of the video and guarantees that no alteration of the recorded image has taken place. Exported video shall also have the ability to be saved in an industry standard file format that can be played on a standard computer operating system. A registered organization shall erase all recordings prior to disposal or sale of the facility.

(g) A registered organization shall keep all security equipment in full operating order and shall test such equipment no less than monthly at each manufacturing facility and dispensing facility that is operated under the registered organization’s registration. Records of security tests must be maintained for five years and made available to the department upon request.

(h) The manufacturing facility of the registered organization must be securely locked and protected from unauthorized entry at all times.

How to Comply with New York § 1004.13 Non-Security-Camera, but Security-Related Regulations:

Alarms, Panic Buttons, Motion Detectors, Voice Dialer, Printer, and Computer

Before we get into the surveillance end, we do want to draw your attention to the requirements for either an alarm system with panic buttons, motion detectors and an auto-dialer. Also, you are required to produce a photograph on demand, so you will want a printer and a PC or Mac onsite as you cannot connect a printer to your NVR.

Battery Backup or a Generator?

So, requirement number 12, "the ability to remain operational during a power outage" should strike you as incredibly odd, if you have read any of the other state regulations. Normally states add a timeframe after this; Nevada says "5 minutes," for example. Why? Because battery backups don't work forever. APC.com has a great tool for calculating and suggesting battery backup products based on time and load. Once you have a quote from us, our staff can tell your approximate power draw for our products. If you were any other state, you then you could pick out the appropriate battery backup that would last the amount of time regulated by that state. New York (and Massachusetts who seems to have copied it word for word) is unique; there's no timeframe listed. The only way to have 100% certainty that you are within the law is to have a local generator that automatically turns on when power is lost; we doubt that this is what was intended by this regulation, but it does appear to be what it says. Additionally, it isn't clear from this regulation what is required to remain operational during a power outage. Talk to a lawyer.

Registered Organizations

We assume this means that there is a list of companies that provide security walkthroughs and certifications in a manner synonymous to the Fire Marshal.

How to Comply with New York's Recording Regulations:

The "Failure Notification System" Requirement

All of NVRs and cameras have notices that go out if the cameras are tampered with, disconnected, damaged, or moved. You can also enabled motion detection alerts and many other video analytics on our Intellipro cameras. However, it seems more likely that this regulation is referencing the alarm or access control system, but it is pretty unclear. Either way, you should be fine.

The "9600 dpi" requirement is absurd.

Honestly, whoever wrote this requirement should be embarrassed. Number one, security cameras don't even use this sort of format to convey resolution; scanners and printers do, and number two, this just isn't enough information here to be meaningful. 1080P video is 1,920 × 1,080 pixels. Let's pretend that you and I both have 1080P TVs; mine is a small 12 inch 1080P TV and yours is a larger 60 inch 1080P TV. The small TV actually has more dots per inch (dpi) than the larger one (same number of dots in either TV as they are both 1080P), but no one would argue that the small TV is better - even though the 60 inch TV is nowhere near 9600 dpi and the 19 inch is well above it. As another way to put this, if you printed a 9x7 photo of a 1080P image it would have a dpi of over 32,000, but if you blew it up to be 36x28 poster, you would no longer be compliant, despite having a larger, more useful print. To convey meaningful information about printing, you need to state both a resolution and an image size; to convey resolution for a file which isn't physical and thus doesn't have inches, you need pixel dimensions. This is just terrible; we have no idea what this regulation even means or how you would apply it. Assuming that they meant a 8.5x11 photo, you'll be fine with 1080P, but 720P wouldn't cut it. If you printed that 720P picture at 9x7, however, it would be over 9600 dpi. See the problem?

Date and Time stamps.

Just about every surveillance system does this.

Image Export Filetypes.

Again, just about every surveillance system does this.

How to Comply with New York's Storage Regulations:

You are required to have 24/7 recording.

So, motion detection based recording as a way to conserve space is out.

You are required to have 90 days of recording.

This is extremely problematic. We made a pretty extensive write up your storage options and needs on the first discussion on this page (Washington state) that goes into products, options and backup/hard drive extension mechanisms. For New York, you would only need 2X of what a provider in Washington State would need on the charts we have listed there.







Alarm system:

7.2.2.1 A compassion center shall have a fully operational security alarm system at each authorized physical address that will provide suitable protection against theft and diversion. For the purpose of these regulations, a fully operational security alarm system shall include:

7.2.2.1.1 immediate automatic or electronic notification to alert local or municipal law enforcement agencies to an unauthorized breach of security at the compassion center or at any other authorized physical address;

7.2.2.1.2 immediate automatic or electronic notification to local or municipal public safety personnel of a loss of electrical support backup system; and

7.2.2.1.3 when appropriate, the security system shall provide protection against theft or diversion that is facilitated or hidden by tampering with computers or electronic records.

7.2.2.2 A compassion center shall conduct a maintenance inspection/test of the alarm system for each authorized location at intervals not to exceed 30 days from the previous inspection/test. A compassion center shall promptly make all necessary repairs to ensure the proper operation of the alarm system.

7.2.2.3 In the event of a failure of the security system, due to loss of electrical support or mechanical malfunction, that is expected to exceed an eight hour period, a compassion center shall:

7.2.2.3.1 within 24 hours of discovery of the event, notify the Department by telephone; and

7.2.2.3.2 provide alternative security measures approved by the Department or close the authorized physical address(es) impacted by the failure/malfunction until the security alarm system has been restored to full operation.

7.2.2.4 A compassion center shall maintain documentation in an auditable form for a period of at least 24 months after the event for:

7.2.2.4.1 all maintenance inspections/tests conducted in response to Section 7.2.2.2 of these regulations, and any servicing, modification or upgrade performed on the security alarm system. The record shall include, as a minimum, the date of the action, a summary of the action(s) performed and the name, signature and title of the individual who performed the action(s);

7.2.2.4.2 any alarm activation or other event which requires response by public safety personnel; and

7.2.2.4.3 any unauthorized breach(es) of security.

7.2.3 Video surveillance: A compassion center shall provide an appropriate video surveillance system that includes the following areas and access to recorded surveillance.

7.2.3.1 Video surveillance should record access areas, customer service areas, growing areas, and anywhere the marijuana is handled, to include processing and packaging areas.

7.2.3.2 Video footage will be digitally recorded and held for an appropriate time period consistent with the Division of Public Health's Records Retention Policy.

7.2.3.3 A compassion center shall provide the Department with access to the video 24-hours a day, seven days a week through a secure internet connection.

How to Comply with Delware's Non-Security-Camera, but Security-Related Regulations:

Alarms and Alert Procedures

Before we get into the surveillance end, we do want to draw your attention to the requirement for an alarm system and for your to have procedures set up in case of a breech or power outage.

Battery Backup

You aren't required to have a battery backup, but considering the hassle associated with the regulated procedures from a power outage, it will cost you less to buy one than it will to manually comply with this part of law. We recommend this APC tool for calculating load.

How to Comply with Delaware's Recording Regulations:

Unlike most states, it doesn't appear that Delaware ever defined a resolution requirement. We recommend 1080P cameras with around a 75 degree angle of view for your own (non-regulatory) security purposes and that's sufficient for most states anyways.

How to Comply with the Delaware Storage Regulations:

You are required to store the footage for an "appropriate time period consistent with the Division of Public Health's Records Retention Policy." We checked the Delaware Division of Public Health's Records Retention Policy and couldn't find any mention of how long this is. Talk to a lawyer. You probably want to store at least 30 days as that's the minimum required by any state and may want to store for 90 days as that's what many other states require.

How to Comply with the Delaware Remote Access Regulations:

You are required to provide the Department of Public Health with "access to the video 24-hours a day, seven days a week through a secure internet connection" which our systems do.







Guam: RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING 16 JOAQUIN (KC) CONCEPCION II, 17 COMPASSIONATE CANNABIS USE, 18 ACT OF 2013

(k) Before an entity with a Dispensary Registration Certificate and/or Cultivation Site Registration Certificate begins operating a dispensary and/or cultivation site, the Responsible Official

Rev. 7/15/2015 93

1 shall ensure that the proposed dispensary and/or cultivation site are in compliance with these rules and regulations, including but not limited to:

(1) Installation of a security system, including a video surveillance system, and alarm system that are all operational, and installation of a safe in accordance with these rules and regulations

...

(A) Devices or a series of devices to detect unauthorized intrusion and movement inside the Dispensary or Cultivations Site, which may include a signal system interconnected with a radio frequency method, such as cellular, private radio signals, or other mechanical or electronic device;

(B) Exterior lighting to facilitate surveillance;

(C) Electronic monitoring including:

(i) At least one 19-inch or greater call-up monitor,

(ii) A video printer capable of immediately producing a clear still photo from any video camera image,

(iii) Video cameras:

(aa) Providing coverage of all entrances to and exits from limited access areas and all entrances to and exits from the building, capable of identifying any activity occurring in or adjacent to the building; and

(bb) Having a recording resolution of at least 704 x 480 or the equivalent;

Rev. 7/15/2015 131

(iv) A video camera at each point of sale location allowing for the identification of any qualifying patient or designated caregiver purchasing medical marijuana,

(v) A video camera in each grow room capable of identifying any activity occurring within the grow room in low light conditions,

(vi) Storage of video recordings from the video cameras for at least 30 calendar days,

(vii) A failure notification system that provides an audible and visual notification of any failure in the electronic monitoring system, and

(viii) Sufficient battery backup for video cameras and recording equipment to support at least five minutes of recording in the event of a power outage, and

(ix) In the event of suspected criminal activity, theft, damage or loss, or unexplained reduction in the amount of medical marijuana inventory, the dispensary and/or cultivation site shall maintain the video recordings from the video cameras for a period no less than three years from the date the incident is reported to the Department and to local law enforcement authorities;

(D) Have at least two operational "panic buttons" located inside the Dispensary or Cultivation Site that are linked with the alarm system that notifies a security company; and

(E) Be programmed to notify a security company that will notify the Responsible Officer or his/her designee in the event of a breach.

(2) Policies and procedures:

Rev. 7/15/2015 132

(A) That restrict access to the areas of the dispensary and/or cultivation site that contain marijuana to authorized individuals only;

(B) That provide for the identification of authorized individuals;

(C) That prevent loitering;

(D) For conducting electronic monitoring; and

(E) For the use of a panic button.

How to Comply with Delaware's Non-Security-Camera, but Security-Related Regulations:

Alarm system, Panic Buttons, 19 inch monitor, Printer, and Computer

Before we get into the surveillance end, we do want to draw your attention to the requirements for an alarm system ("series of devices to detect unauthorized intrusion and movement") with a service contract ("interconnected with a radio frequency method, such as cellular, private radio signals, or other mechanical or electronic device") with at least 2 Panic Buttons and that the alerts are shared with the office the state assigns to your business. Also, you are required to produce a photograph on demand, so you will want a printer and a PC or Mac onsite as you cannot connect a printer to your NVR. Lastly, your monitor will need to be 19 inches or larger, which is pretty much what everyone uses anyways.

Battery Backup

You are required to have a battery backup for at least 5 minutes. We recommend this APC tool for calculating load, we can help you determine the power consumption of your system after you have picked it out.

How to Comply with Guam's Recording Regulations:

Guam seemed to copy their recording regulations straight from Nevada, so here's what we said there:

Like several state we already mentioned on this page, 704 x 480 is not a known recording resolution in surveillance and we have no idea where that came from. 720 x 480 is and that's probably what they meant.

D1 DVRs shoot in 720 x 480. (345,600 total pixels)

With someone 20 feet away, with D1 resolution, your footage would look like this:


The regulation says that you must be able to ID anyone at the point of sale location.

Now, you aren't going to be able to do that with the camera system that shoots in 704x480 (if that existed). You can only do that with HD.

If you go with 720P, you will need a camera about every 30 feet if you want to ID people and the cameras will have 52 degree fields of view. If you go with 1080P, you will need a camera every 50 feet and they will have a 75, 98, or 106 degree field of view (depending on the camera).

Most people opt for at least a 1080P camera. With someone 20 feet away, with 1080P resolution, your footage would look like this:


The Low Light Camera for the Grow Room

Almost all of our IP cameras have either Digital WDR or True WDR which should allow you to meet the regulatory demands for the low light cameras, however this regulation has no specific requirements for their lux rating (how we measure how much light is in a space) to clarify what qualifies as "low light," so it is a bit of a judgement call. True WDR would be your best option.

How to Comply with the Guam Storage Regulations:

Like Washington State, the storage requirements are the hard part. Luckily you are only required to store 30 days of footage, however, you also will need to download footage and store it for 3 years should there be any theft.







(10) Ensure that the outside perimeter of the RMD is sufficiently lit to facilitate surveillance;

(11) Ensure that trees, bushes, and other foliage outside of the RMD do not allow for a person or persons to conceal themselves from sight;

...

(D) Security and Alarm Systems

(1) A RMD shall have an adequate security system to prevent and detect diversion, theft, or loss of marijuana or unauthorized intrusion, utilizing commercial grade equipment, which shall, at a minimum, include:

(a) A perimeter alarm on all entry points and perimeter windows;

(b) A failure notification system that provides an audible, text, or visual notification of any failure in the surveillance system. The failure notification system shall provide an alert to designated employees of the RMD within five minutes after the failure, either by telephone, email, or text message;

(c) A duress alarm, panic alarm, or holdup alarm connected to local public safety or law enforcement authorities;

(d) Video cameras in all areas that may contain marijuana, at all points of entry and exit, and in any parking lot, which shall be appropriate for the normal lighting conditions of the area under surveillance. The cameras shall be directed at all safes, vaults, sales areas, and areas where marijuana is cultivated, harvested, processed, prepared, stored, handled, or dispensed. Cameras shall be angled so as to allow for the capture of clear and certain identification of any person entering or exiting the RMD or area;

(e) Twenty-four hour recordings from all video cameras that are available for immediate viewing by the Department upon request and that are retained for at least 90 calendar days. Recordings shall not be destroyed or altered, and shall be retained as long as necessary if the RMD is aware of a pending criminal, civil, or administrative investigation, or legal proceeding for which the recording may contain relevant information;

(f) The ability to immediately produce a clear, color, still photo (live or recorded);

(g) A date and time stamp embedded on all recordings. The date and time shall be synchronized and set correctly and shall not significantly obscure the picture;

(h) The ability to remain operational during a power outage; and

(i) A video recording that allows for the exporting of still images in an industry standard image format, including .jpg, .bmp, and .gif. Exported video shall have the ability to be archived in a proprietary format that ensures authentication of the video and guarantees that no alteration of the recorded image has taken place. Exported video shall also have the ability to be saved in an industry standard file format that can be played on a standard computer operating system. All recordings shall be erased or destroyed prior to disposal.

(2) All security system equipment and recordings shall be maintained in a secure location so

Regulation As Approved by the Public Health Council – Last Modified 5.8.13

105 CMR: Department of Public Health as to prevent theft, loss, destruction, and alterations.

(3) In addition to the requirements listed in 105 CMR 725.110(D)(1) and (2), the RMD shall have a back-up alarm system, with all capabilities of the primary system, provided by a company supplying commercial grade equipment, which shall not be the same company supplying the primary security system.

(4) Access to surveillance areas shall be limited to persons that are essential to surveillance operations, law enforcement authorities acting within their lawful jurisdiction, security system service personnel, and the Department. A current list of authorized employees and service personnel that have access to the surveillance room must be available to the Department upon request. If on-site, surveillance rooms shall remain locked and shall not be used for any other function.

(5) All security equipment shall be in good working order and shall be inspected and tested at regular intervals, not to exceed 30 calendar days from the previous inspection and test.

How to Comply with Massachusetts's Non-Security-Camera, but Security-Related Regulations:

2 Different Alarms, Sufficient Lighting, Trimmed Bushes, Printer, and Computer

Massachusetts has a rather unique clause about how you need to both provide sufficient lighting and keep your bushes trimmed as to prevent anyone from hiding in them (or anything else), so keep that in mind. Also, you are required to produce a photograph on demand, so you will want a printer and a PC or Mac onsite as you cannot connect a printer to your NVR. Lastly, you need to have 2 (!) completely different alarms and alarm monitoring companies. Ouch.

Battery Backup or a Generator?

So, Massachusetts seems to have copied part of their law from New York, so here' what we had to say about that in the New York section:

"[T]he ability to remain operational during a power outage" should strike you as incredibly odd, if you have read any of the other state regulations. Normally states add a timeframe after this; Nevada says "5 minutes," for example. Why? Because battery backups don't work forever. APC.com has a great tool for calculating and suggesting battery backup products based on time and load. Once you have a quote from us, our staff can tell your approximate power draw for our products. If you were any other state, you then you could pick out the appropriate battery backup that would last the amount of time regulated by that state. New York (and Massachusetts who seems to have copied it word for word) is unique; there's no timeframe listed. The only way to have 100% certainty that you are within the law is to have a local generator that automatically turns on when power is lost; we doubt that this is what was intended by this regulation, but it does appear to be what it says. Additionally, it isn't clear from this regulation what is required to remain operational during a power outage. Talk to a lawyer.

How to Comply with Massachusetts's Recording Regulations:

The "Failure Notification System" Requirement

All of NVRs and cameras have notices that go out if the cameras are tampered with, disconnected, damaged, or moved. You can also enabled motion detection alerts and many other video analytics on our Intellipro cameras. However, it seems more likely that this regulation is referencing the alarm or access control system, but it is pretty unclear. Either way, you should be fine.

Date and Time stamps.

Just about every surveillance system does this.

Image Export Filetypes.

Again, just about every surveillance system does this.

How to Comply with the Massachusetts Storage Regulations:

How to Comply with Massachusetts's Storage Regulations:

You are required to have 24/7 recording.

So, motion detection based recording as a way to conserve space is out.

You are required to have 90 days of recording.

This is extremely problematic. We made a pretty extensive write up your storage options and needs on the first discussion on this page (Washington state) that goes into products, options and backup/hard drive extension mechanisms. For New York, you would only need 2X of what a provider in Washington State would need on the charts we have listed there.







G. To prevent unauthorized access to medical marijuana at the dispensary and, if applicable, the dispensary’s cultivation site, the dispensary shall have the following:

1. Security equipment to deter and prevent unauthorized entrance into limited access areas that include:

a. Devices or a series of devices to detect unauthorized intrusion, which may include a signal system interconnected with a radio frequency method, such as cellular, private radio signals, or other mechanical or electronic device;

b. Exterior lighting to facilitate surveillance;

c. Electronic monitoring including:

i. At least one 19-inch or greater call-up monitor;

ii. A video printer capable of immediately producing a clear still photo from any video camera image;

iii. Video cameras:

(1) Providing coverage of all entrances to and exits from limited access areas and all entrances to and exits from the building, capable of identifying any activity occurring in or adjacent to the building, and

(2) Having a recording resolution of least at 704 x 480 or the equivalent;

iv. A video camera at each point of sale location allowing for the identification of any qualifying patient or designated caregiver purchasing medical marijuana;

v. A video camera in each grow room capable of identifying any activity occurring within the grow room in low light conditions;

vi. Storage of video recordings from the video cameras for at least 30 calendar days;

vii. A failure notification system that provides an audible and visual notification of any failure in the electronic monitoring system; and

viii. Sufficient battery backup for video cameras and recording equipment to support at least five minutes of recording in the event of a power outage; and

d. Panic buttons in the interior of each building;

How to Comply with Delaware's Non-Security-Camera, but Security-Related Regulations:

Alarm system, Panic Buttons, 19 inch monitor, Printer, and Computer

Before we get into the surveillance end, we do want to draw your attention to the requirements for an alarm system ("series of devices to detect unauthorized intrusion") with a service contract ("interconnected with a radio frequency method, such as cellular, private radio signals, or other mechanical or electronic device"). Also, you are required to produce a photograph on demand, so you will want a printer and a PC or Mac onsite as you cannot connect a printer to your NVR. Lastly, your monitor will need to be 19 inches or larger, which is pretty much what everyone uses anyways.

Battery Backup

You are required to have a battery backup for at least 5 minutes. We recommend this APC tool for calculating load, we can help you determine the power consumption of your system after you have picked it out.

How to Comply with Arizona's Recording Regulations:

Arizona seemed to copy their recording regulations straight from Nevada, so here's what we said there:

Like several state we already mentioned on this page, 704 x 480 is not a known recording resolution in surveillance and we have no idea where that came from. 720 x 480 is and that's probably what they meant.

D1 DVRs shoot in 720 x 480. (345,600 total pixels)

With someone 20 feet away, with D1 resolution, your footage would look like this:


The regulation says that you must be able to ID anyone at the point of sale location.

Now, you aren't going to be able to do that with the camera system that shoots in 704x480 (if that existed). You can only do that with HD.

If you go with 720P, you will need a camera about every 30 feet if you want to ID people and the cameras will have 52 degree fields of view. If you go with 1080P, you will need a camera every 50 feet and they will have a 75, 98, or 106 degree field of view (depending on the camera).

Most people opt for at least a 1080P camera. With someone 20 feet away, with 1080P resolution, your footage would look like this:


The Low Light Camera for the Grow Room

Almost all of our IP cameras have either Digital WDR or True WDR which should allow you to meet the regulatory demands for the low light cameras, however this regulation has no specific requirements for their lux rating (how we measure how much light is in a space) to clarify what qualifies as "low light," so it is a bit of a judgement call. True WDR would be your best option.

How to Comply with the Arizona Storage Regulations:

Like Washington State, the storage requirements are the hard part. Luckily you are only required to store 30 days of footage, however, you also will need to download footage and store it for 3 years should there be any theft.







3 AAC 306.715. Security alarm systems and lock standards. (a) Each licensee, employee, or agent of a marijuana establishment shall display an identification badge issued by the marijuana establishment at all times when on the marijuana establishment’s licensed premises.

(b) The licensed premises of a marijuana establishment must have

(1) exterior lighting to facilitate surveillance;

(2) a security alarm system on all exterior doors and windows; and

(3) continuous video monitoring as provided in 3 AAC 306.720.

(c) A marijuana establishment shall have policies and procedures that

(1) are designed to prevent diversion of marijuana or marijuana product;

(2) prevent loitering;

(3) describe the use of any additional security device, such as a motion detector, pressure switch, and duress, panic, or hold-up alarm to enhance security of the licensed premises; and

(4) describe the actions to be taken by a licensee, employee, or agent of the marijuana establishment when any automatic or electronic notification system alerts a local law enforcement agency of an unauthorized breach of security.

(d) A marijuana establishment shall use commercial grade, non-residential door locks on all exterior entry points to the licensed premises.

3 AAC 306.720. Video surveillance.

(a) A marijuana establishment shall install and maintain a video surveillance and camera recording system as provided in this section. The video system must cover

(1) each restricted access area and each entrance to a restricted access area within the licensed premises;

(2) each entrance to the exterior of the licensed premises; and

(3) each point-of-sale area.

(b) At a marijuana establishment, a required video camera must be placed in a way that produces a clear view adequate to identify any individual inside the licensed premises, or within 20 feet of each entrance to the licensed premises. Both the interior and the exterior of each entrance to the facility must be recorded by a video camera.

(c) Any area where marijuana is grown, cured, or manufactured, or where marijuana waste is destroyed, must have a camera placement in the room facing the primary entry door, and in adequate fixed positions, at a height that will provide a clear, unobstructed view of the regular activity without a sight blockage from lighting hoods, fixtures, or other equipment, in order to allow for the clear and certain identification of any person and activity in the area at all times.

(d) Surveillance recording equipment and video surveillance records must be housed in a locked and secure area or in a lock box, cabinet, closet or other secure area that is accessible only to a marijuana establishment licensee or authorized employee, and to law enforcement personnel including a peace officer or an agent of the board. A marijuana establishment may use an offsite monitoring service and offsite storage of video surveillance records if security requirements at the offsite facility are at least as strict as onsite security requirements as described in this section.

(e) Each surveillance recording must be preserved for a minimum of 40 days, in a format that can be easily accessed for viewing. All recorded images must clearly and accurately display the time and date, and must be archived in a format that does not permit alteration of the recorded image, so that the images can readily be authenticated. After 40 days, a marijuana establishment may erase video recordings, unless the licensee knows or should know of any pending criminal, civil, or administrative investigation for which the video recording may contain relevant information.

How to Comply with Alaska's Non-Security-Camera, but Security-Related Regulations:

Sufficient Lighting, Alarm on all Door and Windows, and Alarm Monitoring

Alaska requires you to provide sufficient lighting to facilitate surveillance, so keep that in mind. You need to have an alarm on all exterior doors and windows and use an alarm monitoring company.

How to Comply with Alaska's Recording Regulations:

Alaska does not require any specific recording regulation, but does require you to be able to ID a face at 20 ft.

Now, you aren't going to be able to do that with the camera system that shoots below 720P. You can only do that with HD.

If you go with 720P, you will need a camera about every 30 feet if you want to ID people and the cameras will have 52 degree fields of view. If you go with 1080P, you will need a camera every 50 feet and they will have a 75, 98, or 106 degree field of view (depending on the camera).

Most people opt for at least a 1080P camera. With someone 20 feet away, with 1080P resolution, your footage would look like this:


How to Comply with the Alaska Storage Regulations:

Luckily you are only required to store 40 days of footage, however, you also will need to download footage and store it should there be any theft or other incident that involves (or should involve) the police.







4. Video Surveillance Requirements. Each licensed cultivator must have a fully operational video surveillance and camera recording system with appropriate protocols, which shall, at a minimum, comply with the below requirements:

a. Video surveillance equipment shall, at a minimum, consist of digital or network video recorders, video monitors, and digital archiving devices capable of playback quality sufficient to identify and monitor all individuals (including sufficient clarity of facial features) and activities in the monitored areas.

b. The recording system must record in digital format.

c. The date and time must be embedded on the recording without significantly obscuring the picture. Time is to be measured in Eastern Standard Time.

d. All video surveillance systems must be equipped with a failure notification system that provides prompt notification of any surveillance interruption and/or the complete failure of the surveillance system. Said notification must be routed to licensed cultivator personnel specifically designated by management and to DBR.

e. All video surveillance equipment shall have sufficient battery backup to support a minimum of four (4) hours of recording in the event of a power outage.

f. Video recordings must be archived in a format and maintained in a manner that ensures authentication of the recording as legitimately-captured video and guarantees that no alteration of the recorded image has taken place.

g. Remote access to a continuous live feed video on a real time basis must be available at all times to licensed cultivator personnel specifically designated by management and to DBR. Additionally, all video surveillance records and recordings must be made available upon request to DBR.

h. The system must include a color printer or similar equipment capable of printing still photos of a quality sufficient to identify individuals and activities in the monitored areas.

i. Camera coverage is required for all areas where marijuana and marijuana products are grown, cultivated, stored, weighed, packaged, processed, or manufactured, including all areas of ingress and egress thereto, security rooms (as defined below), all points of ingress and egress to the exterior of the licensed cultivator, and any computer or other digital access points.

j. Camera views of required coverage areas shall be continuously recorded twenty (24) hours a day, (7) seven days per week.

k. All surveillance recordings must be kept for a minimum of sixty (60) calendar days.

l. Surveillance recording equipment and all video surveillance records and recordings must be housed in a designated, locked and secured room or other enclosure with access limited to licensed cultivator personnel specifically authorized by management (the “security room”). The licensed cultivator must keep on site a current list of all authorized employees and service personnel who have access to the security room and a video surveillance equipment maintenance activity log.

m. If the licensed cultivator suffers a failure of the surveillance system, due to loss of electrical support, mechanical function, or otherwise, that is expected to exceed an eight (8) hour period, in addition to the notice requirements provided in Sections 4(F)(4)(d) and Section 4(F)(7), the licensed cultivator must also close the licensed cultivator premises until the video surveillance system has been restored to full operation, or, if approved by DBR, provide alternative premises monitoring.

How to Comply with Rhode Island's Recording Regulations:

It has to be digital. Check. Almost every system you buy these days - even analog cameras (which aren't digital) get recorded by a DVR (digital video recorder) in a digital format.

It also has to have a monitor and a DVR or NVR. Also, pretty much standard operating procedure for security cameras.

It also has to have a timestamp on the video footage - again, almost all security cameras have this, just don't use a webcam.

It needs a live feed for monitoring. All our recorders have this, but need an internet connection to send the video feed out.

You need to record 24/7 rather than on motion.

You are required to have a printer on site. This means having a PC or Mac onsite is necessary since you cannot connect a printer to your NVR.

It must be "capable of playback quality sufficient to identify and monitor all individuals (including sufficient clarity of facial features) and activities in the monitored areas." Monitored areas are defined as "all areas where marijuana and marijuana products are grown, cultivated, stored, weighed, packaged, processed, or manufactured, including all areas of ingress and egress thereto, security rooms (as defined below), all points of ingress and egress to the exterior of the licensed cultivator, and any computer or other digital access points."

This is where this gets a little complicated. For a space that is 25 feet in length, you aren't going to be able to do that with the camera system that shoots below 720P. You can only do that with HD.

If you go with 1080P, you will need a camera every 50 feet and they will have a 75, 98, or 106 degree field of view (depending on the camera).

It is probably best to send us a floorplan and identify for us which rooms meet the state's definition of a "monitored area."

Most people opt for at least a 1080P camera. With someone 20 feet away, with 1080P resolution, your footage would look like this:


How to Comply with the Rhode Island Storage Regulations:

You are required to store 60 days of footage, which puts you around the middle of the pack in terms of regulatory requirements on storage.







RR 6.2. Construction of Premises...

b. Commercial grade, non-residential door locks shall be installed on every external door, and gate if applicable. All external locks shall be equipped with biometric access controls. Only authorized personnel shall have access to locked and secured areas. Facilities shall maintain detailed records of employees with access to locked and secured areas. Records shall be made available to the Division upon request.

RR 6.4. Alarm System

a. All cultivation facilities shall be equipped with an alarm system which, upon attempted unauthorized entry, shall transmit a signal directly to a central protection company or a local or State police agency which has a legal duty to respond. A designated agent of the cultivation facility shall also receive notification of any such signal.

b. Alarm systems shall provide coverage for all points of ingress and egress to the facility, including, but not limited to, doorways, windows, loading bays, skylights, and retractable roof mechanisms.

c. Alarm systems shall provide coverage of any room with an exterior wall, any room containing a safe, and any room used to grow or store medical marijuana.

d. Alarm systems shall be equipped with a “panic device” that upon activation will not only sound any audible alarm components, but will also notify law enforcement.

e. Alarm systems shall have “duress” and “hold up” features to enable an agent to activate a silent alarm notifying law enforcement of an emergency.

f. Alarms system must be equipped with failure notification systems to notify cultivation facilities and law enforcement of any failure in the alarm system.

g. Alarm systems shall have the ability to remain operational during a power outage.

RR 6.5. Video Surveillance System

a. All cultivation facilities shall be equipped with video surveillance systems consisting of the following:

i. Digital video cameras; vABC - 13

ii. 24 hour per day, 7 day per week recording capabilities;

iii. The ability to remain operational during a power outage;

iv. Digital archiving capabilities;

v. On-site and off-site monitoring capabilities; and

vi. All facilities must maintain at least one on-site display monitor connected to the surveillance system at all times. The monitor shall have a screen size of at least 12 inches.

b. All cultivation facilities shall maintain camera coverage of the following areas:

i. All points of ingress and egress to the facility, including, but not limited to, doorways, windows, loading bays, skylights, and retractable roof mechanisms;

ii. Any room with an exterior wall, except restrooms, any room containing a safe, and any room or area used to grow, process, manufacture, or store medical marijuana;

iii. All areas in which any part of the disposal process of marijuana occurs; and

iv. All parking areas and any alley areas immediately adjacent to the building.

c. All recording devices shall display a date and time stamp on all recorded video.

d. All recording devices shall have the capability to produce a still image from the video recording, and each facility shall maintain, on site, a video printer capable of immediately producing a clear still image from any video camera image.

e. Access to on-site surveillance system controls and monitoring shall be limited to authorized personnel. Cultivation facilities shall identify individuals with access to surveillance system controls and monitoring upon request by the Division.

f. All surveillance recordings shall be maintained for a minimum of 90 days.

How to Comply with Arkansas's Non-Security-Camera, but Security-Related Regulations:

Commercial Grade Locks and Alarm System

Arkansas requires you to install commercial grade locks with a biometric access control system that logs coming and going. You need to have an alarm on all exterior doors and windows and use an alarm monitoring company.

How to Comply with Arkansas's Recording Regulations:

Unlike most states, Arkansas has no rules on the quality of the recordings.

Arkansas does require you to have these features with your systems: digital backup capacity, the ability to produce still images, timestamps on all footage. These features come standard on all our systems.

Arkansas requires that you place cameras so that they can observer all doors, windows, potential entry points (even unconventional ones, like skylights), and any room with an exterior wall. You must have cameras that cover all areas that store, process, dispose, or produce marijuana. You have to cover the parking lots and your safe.

Most people opt for at least a 1080P camera. With someone 20 feet away, with 1080P resolution, your footage would look like this:

You must have a 12 inch or greater monitor connected to the system at all times, a printer availible to print stills, and you have to control who can use the surveillance system on a need-to-know basis.


How to Comply with the Arkansas Storage Regulations:

You are required to store 90 days of footage, which puts you in the upper end in terms of regulatory requirements on storage.


*We're not lawyers and laws do change. We try our best to keep this page updated with changes to the law, but you should always do you own research or hire your own lawyer to guarantee compliance with the law.


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